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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
was performing another person's song. at that time, in 2002, in 2003, you'll remember the south korean people were angry about america about a situation that happened in america that was tragic that involved a south korean. do you think, though, that when he apologizes, is that enough? >> no. >> to be able to be granted a chance to perform at the annual christmas show in washington. >> he didn't just do it's once. he did it twice. it was a protest rally against americans. supposedly he's popular on youtube, everybody's seen him dancing around, doing all that, doesn't mean you get an audience with the president of the united states in one of our most celebrated holidays. he should be on the no-fly list for what he did, for goodness sakes, let alone meeting with the president of the united states. it doesn't make sense. it's offensive to the servicemen and women, their families, their loved ones, who are out there in harm's way, to put this punk out there with the president of the united states in one of our most celebrated holidays. it's just wrong. >> i wonder if he's had any -- like a true c
, nearly a third of the market will be north and south america. a third will be europe and russia and africa. and about a third of the market will be asia pacific. and in china's case, to your point, china now has replaced the united states as the largest auto market. the chinese veitremendous respe for history. they know about henry ford and lincoln. so we'll be bringing the first lincoln vehicles to china in 2014. >> alan mulally, ford president and ceo. thank you for coming on. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> now this. an infant left without her parents after an nfl player just snaps. and now as a city mourns, sportscaster bob costas goes off on gun control. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> if syria's chemical weapons are on the move, who's watching them? and where do they end up? >>> plus, as eight more people die in chicago -- >> we walk through a front door that was wide open. you can see the equipment is here. this was defunded by the program because they couldn't figure out what they had done with the money. >> -- cnn investigates the program getting cash to st
but starting today anyone with a phone in key emerging markets in india and south america and australia can sign up and it will roll out worldwide including here in the u.s. becky? >> julia, thank you very much. we'll be watching all that as it comes out later today. >>> let's talk consequences of the fiscal cliff. companies of announces dividends in recent days trying to avoid the tax hikes set to kick in at the end of the year. who is really making money on this? >> a lot of people especially ceos more than 110 companies have announced special dividends in the fourth quarter alone that's more than three times last year's fourth quarter. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff tax rates on dividends could go from 15% to more than 43%. companies are racing to beat the tax hikes by paying dividends before december 31st and some of the biggest beneficiaries, both insiders and ceos. mickey arison is getting $89 million from carnival giving him a potential tax savings. and larry elison is getting savings around $56 million. thomas frist at hca is getting around $350 million, saving
, and south america, which we really don't have now. really makes us a global powerhouse. >> you know, is the underwear business and the jeans business a bigger business than the suit business for example? >> yes. the underwear business worldwide is over a billion dollars in sales and jeans business is close to $2 billion. so those are the two largest categories followed by fragrance which is about a billion and a half dollars. >> when you did the tommy deal you knocked the cover off the ball. you put some numbers out. you delevered the company quickly. now you're back doing the warnerco deal. is this going to be as transformational? >> i think in some ways it's going to be more transformational. it really opens up two key markets for us to operate directly. today we are operating on joint ventures and licensing arrangements. so in asia, china specifically, ind india, and in latin america with brazil, you know, really opening up the developing economies, where warnaco, in those two areas approaching 20%. >> phillips-van heusen, to be able to transform it from what we think of when we
and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses welcome to the world leader in derivatives. welcome to superderivatives. >>> we already bailed out a couple of its auto companies, but now should the federal government bail out the entire city of detroit? incredibly, some say yes. ahead of president obama's visit to detroit monday, that will be his first in nearly eight months, detroit councilwoman e joe -- joanne watson thinks so. >> our peopl
poverty trends in america. so there are pockets in the south, pockets in the appalachian mountains, pockets in urban areas that where there's poverty, there is going to be people needing help. and you know what? they're finding givelocally.net can deliver their needs quickerer, more efficiently than anything out there. we're passionate about helping as many as we can. >> is it set up as a corporation or a nonprofit? >> we made a kshgz decision not to be a 501(c)3 for many reasons, including there's no limit to where we can direct the money. so we can help anyone with any need that's legitimate. but here is the thing. the 501(c)3 exemption was added to this tax code in 1917. as beau said, there are more than 1 million registered 501(c)3s right now and poverty is at its historic high. if you're a business, that's a model one could argue isn't working. we're letting the market decide. we're letting the american people decide. do you want to give $50, $75, $100 on givelocally.net? >> how do you pay your expenses? >> as a start-up with investment, we create jobs and pay our people. but
and south dakota to the list of states where republican governors are still fighting obama care. i'll ask howard dean what this means for the people. >>> i know you are, but what am i? >> america's zaniest congressman takes a stand on a cause close to his heart. >> we shouldn't eliminate the word lunatic. it really has application around this town. >>> and apple's ceo breaks big news to brian williams on "rock center." >> we've been working for years on doing more and more in the united states. and next year we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> tonight, the story behind apple's economic patriotism in an era of bain capital. with e.j. dionne. treatment as prilosec otc. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero hea
years out, 20 years out. he wants to keep the game robust, keep it america's pastime. and obviously, he wants to keep participation high because that will keep popularity high. >> we come from the football capital of the country, the south, where it's a ritual. but, i mean, i have friends in the south whose kids don't play. >> let me tell you, i played football from the time i was 8 years old, from 8 to 18. it was my life. we watched, you know, s.e.c. football every saturday. sunday. >> they have helmets when you played? >> yeah, they did. >>letter? >> yeah, they were leather. >> that explanation's out the door. >> watched nfl on sunday. it was our life. but i will tell you, i did not ever really want my kids to play football. it's gotten too dangerous. >> scary. >> we're going to have to reexamine what we do. >> to hear big football fans like you guys say shows that t real issue. >> not only big football fans but, you know, 6'4". i weigh way too much. i still don't know that i would -- >> 5'11". >> yeah. see, you get broken in half on the field. >> what do you run the 40 in? >> i used
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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